Akhilesh Yadav dares Modi govt to ban export of beef

When silence and display of tolerance are the only medicines that can heal the wound of Gautam Buddha Nagar’s Bisara village, the lawmakers are doing nothing to ensure the return of normalcy.

Surprisingly, Chief Minister Akhilesh Yadav on Friday dared Prime Minister Narendra Modi to impose a blanket ban on export of beef.

“A rumour may pass unnoticed. But it can also play havoc. They are taking up this issue. They also talk about pink revolution. We want to ask why they don’t ban its export?” he asked in a public meeting in Lucknow.

“They have come to power with a majority. He is roaming across the world and marketing the country. He must think what the people of those countries eat from morning to evening. I don’t want to make any comment. But he should take up this issue with the world community and ban its export completely,” Akhilesh further said without mentioning the name of the PM, with whom his father and Samajwadi Party (SP) president Mulayam Singh Yadav has recently developed political proximity.

Beef Ban Akhilesh Yadav Ikhlaq Uttar Pradesh Murder
Pic Courtesy: Huffington Post. Ikhlaq’s Family

Akhilesh added saying India is a country of 125 crore population where people have liberty to lead their lives according to their wish and nobody should try to interfere into it.

But the chief minister, who had come to power in 2012 with the vote of over 19 percent Muslim population in the state, remained silent on the demand of the family of Mohammad Ikhlaq to order a probe by Central Bureau of Investigation. Ikhlaq was lynched to death by a mob alleging that he had sacrificed a cow and his family consumed it for dinner. His injured son Mohammad Danish (21) is on ventilator in Noida’s Kailash Hospital.

Cow butchery and sale of beef are cognisable and non-bailable offence in UP under Prevention of Cow Slaughter Act 1955. However, this act doesn’t cover flesh imported in the state in sealed containers and sold in open market. The act also allows bull slaughter after obtaining a “fit-for-slaughter” certificate which is given if the cattle are over the age of 15 and not fit for agricultural works and breeding.

The CM was apparently trying to remind Modi how he had targeted the previous Congress-led UPA government during 2014 election campaign, blaming them for encouraging pink revolution-expansion meat export to other countries.

Stretching it a bit further, Azam Khan, urban development and minority affairs minister of UP said, “It is written in the menu of five star hotels that they serve the meat of cow and pig. It should be banned immediately by those who want to punish the Muslims because they didn’t desert the country and went Pakistan. The Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) wants to push the state in communal frenzy before 2017 Assembly elections. They want to do so because their 2013 Muzaffarnagar experiment succeeded in 2014 election.”

Courtesy: India Today

Stampede at Mecca kills 717 pilgrims

Mina, Saudi Arabia: A horrific stampede killed at least 717 pilgrims and injured hundreds more Thursday on the outskirts of the holy city of Mecca in Saudi Arabia, the deadliest tragedy to strike the annual hajj pilgrimage in more than two decades.

A 60 year-old lady of LB Nagar, Hyderabad too died in the hajj stampede, CNN IBN reported, and at least 21 Indians were injured in the tragedy. According to reports, over one lakh Indians are in Mecca for Hajj.

At least 863 pilgrims were injured in the crush, said the Saudi civil defense directorate, which provided the death toll. The tragedy struck as Muslims around the world marked the start of the Eid al-Adha holiday.

It was the second major disaster during this year’s hajj season, raising questions about the adequacy of measures put in place by Saudi authorities to ensure the safety of the roughly 2 million Muslims taking part. A crane collapse in Mecca nearly two weeks earlier left 111 people dead.

Saudi Arabia takes great pride in its role as the caretaker of Islam’s holiest sites and host to millions of pilgrims annually. But the hajj poses an immense logistical and security challenge for the kingdom given the sheer number of hundreds of thousands of people — from differing linguistic and cultural backgrounds, many of whom have saved for years for a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity — intent on following the same set of rituals at about the same time.

Mecca. AP

Thursday’s crush happened in Mina, a large valley about 5 kilometers (3 miles) from Mecca that has been the site of hajj stampedes in years past.

Mina is where pilgrims carry out a symbolic stoning of the devil by throwing pebbles against three stone columns. It also houses more than 160,000 tents where pilgrims spend the night during the pilgrimage.

Thursday’s tragedy struck during a morning surge of pilgrims at the intersection of streets 204 and 223 as the faithful were making their way toward a large structure overlooking the columns, according to the Saudi civil defense directorate.

The multi-story structure, known as Jamarat Bridge, is designed to ease the pressure of the crowds and prevent pilgrims from being trampled.

Ambulance sirens blared as rescue crews rushed the injured to nearby hospitals.

More than 220 rescue vehicles and some 4,000 members of the emergency services were deployed soon after the stampede to try to ease the congestion and provide alternative exit routes, according to the directorate.

Amateur video shared on social media showed a horrific scene, with scores of bodies — the men dressed in the simple terry cloth garments worn during hajj — lying amid crushed wheelchairs and water bottles along a sunbaked street.

Survivors assessed the scene from the top of roadside stalls near white tents as rescue workers in orange and yellow vests combed the area.

International media covering the hajj, including The Associated Press journalists in Mina, were restricted from visiting the site of the accident for several hours and from immediately leaving an Information Ministry complex where the press is housed during the final three days of the pilgrimage per government rules.

Photos released by the directorate on its official Twitter account showed rescue workers helping the wounded onto stretchers and loading them onto ambulances near some of the tents.

Some 2 million people are taking part in this year’s hajj pilgrimage, which is an obligation of every able-bodied Muslim. The pilgrimage began in earnest Tuesday.

Saudi authorities take extensive precautions to ensure the security of the hajj and the safety of pilgrims. There are about 100,000 security forces deployed this year to oversee crowd management and ensure pilgrims’ safety during the five-day pilgrimage.

At Mina specifically, authorities have put measures in place over the years to try to alleviate the pressure posed by masses of pilgrims converging on the site of the stoning ritual.

Officials use surveillance cameras and other equipment to limit the number of people converging on the site, and the Jamarat Bridge has multiple exits to facilitate the flow of people.

But tragedies are not uncommon.

The death toll from Thursday’s crush far exceeded that of a similar incident in 2006, near the same site, when more than 360 pilgrims were killed in a stampede. Another stampede at Mina in 2004 left 244 pilgrims dead and hundreds injured.

The deadliest hajj-related tragedy happened in 1990, when at least 1,426 pilgrims perished in a stampede in an overcrowded pedestrian tunnel leading to holy sites in Mecca.

The latest tragedy is certain to have touched many different countries as the victims likely included pilgrims of different nationalities.

At least 41 Iranian pilgrims perished and at least 60 were injured in Thursday’s crush, according to the chief of the Iranian hajj organizing agency. Saeed Ohadi blamed Saudi Arabia for “safety errors” and said in comments to Iranian state TV that “mismanagement by the Saudis” led to the tragedy.

Thursday’s crush happened less than two weeks after a giant construction crane came crashing down on the Grand Mosque in Mecca, the focal point of the hajj. The Sept. 11 accident killed at least 111 people and injured more than 390.

Authorities blamed the crane collapse on high winds during an unusually powerful storm, and faulted the construction giant Saudi Binladin Group, which oversees construction at the mosque, for not following operating procedures.

Courtesy: First Post